Haneda Airport to be opened to daytime arrivals for U.S. airlines

This week, the governments of Japan and the United States reached an agreement with regards to U.S.-based airlines  flying into Haneda, the closest airport to Tokyo.

A few years back, U.S. airlines were permitted four daily round-trips from U.S. cities to Haneda, but these flights were restricted to evening hours, when the airport is not busy… and close to the times that public transportation options become limited. This could have proved to be a headache, as I suggested back in 2011, though the opening of a hotel within Haneda’s International terminal in 2014 eased the travel worries somewhat.

Under the new agreement, however, U.S. airlines will be permitted to land at Haneda during regular daytime hours. The slots will change from four round-trips during the night hours to five round-trips during the day, and one round-trip during the evening. The changes will be implemented as early as this coming autumn.

This is tremendous news for travelers between the United States and Japan, as you can now enjoy all of the amenities that Haneda has to offer, while being able to travel into Tokyo quickly and cheaply by train or monorail.

Two of the three major U.S. airlines – American and United – support this agreement. Delta Air Lines, on the other hand, opposes it. Delta feels that the slot change at Haneda to permit more U.S. arrivals during the daytime could compromise its hub operations at Narita Airport and put its U.S.-Japan flights into jeopardy, since travelers would prefer to land at Haneda.

One other aspect that tilts against Delta is the fact that American and United have partners in Japan: American partners with Japan Airlines in the Oneworld alliance, and United partners with All Nippon in the Star Alliance. With Haneda Airport offering plenty of domestic flights from its two domestic terminals, there is an opportunity for US travelers to easily connect between international and domestic flights. In fact, Japan Airlines already offers easy International-to-Domestic connections from the International Terminal building – once you clear customs and immigration and drop off your baggage, you clear security in the International terminal and then board a bus to the secure area of the JAL domestic terminal.

In my opinion, this is a win for travelers who now have better ways to see Japan through the new daytime arrivals and departures at Haneda. What are your thoughts?

Delta plans to resume Tokyo-Osaka flights for International Passengers

With Japanese tourism booming thanks to the weak yen and tax breaks on purchases for foreigners, Delta appears to be resuming inter-Japan service from Tokyo Narita to Osaka Kansai.

You wouldn’t know about this unless you looked at Delta’s official press release in Japanese. Starting in late march 2016, Delta will offer one daily trip from Narita to Kansai, and one flight from Kansai to Narita, using a Boeing 757. The flights to/from Osaka will only be available for international Delta passengers connecting at Narita to/from an international Delta flight. Currently, Delta operates nonstop flights between Tokyo Narita and sixteen destinations in the United States and Asia.

It is interesting to see how these connections in Tokyo will be arranged. It’s possible (but not certain, at least from my current understanding) that the connections will be treated as International Transfers – that is, there would be no immigration or customs formalities handled at Narita Airport. This sort of arrangement has been used in the past…. as an example, if you flew into Japan on Delta and you are booked onto this new flight with Osaka as your destination, you would go through international transfers, fly to Osaka, and go through customs/immigration at Kansai Airport. On the return from Osaka, you would go through Osaka’s immigration to receive your departure stamp. When landing at Narita, again, you would go through international transfers to board your flight back home.

This is a very convenient arrangement if it will be implemented in this fashion. In addition to the above, your checked luggage can be checked through to your final destination. One important thing to note, though: When you go through international transfers in Narita, you will have to go through a security check. This means that if you purchase and bring DUTY FREE LIQUIDS beforehand, you must ensure that they are in tamper-evident bags. If they are not in tamper-evident bags, they will be confiscated as the 3 oz / 100 ml liquid rule will apply.

Osaka has several cool places to visit, including the Umeda Sky Building, Kaiyukan Aquarium, and the Dotonbori Canal. It is also the gateway to the ancient capital of Kyoto, which can be accessed by direct train or bus from Kansai Airport. If your trip’s focus is on western Japan, including areas such as Hiroshima, Fukuoka, Shikoku and Kyushu, Kansai is a convenient starting point – you can take westbound bullet trains from Shin-Osaka station.

If you have a voucher for the Japan Rail Pass it can be exchanged at the JR ticket office in Kansai Airport, open daily until 11 PM.

The airport itself is a site to behold, built on a man-made island and featuring one of the world’s longest airport concourses.

And the fares just keep on falling… under $700 r/t on Delta

Update 4/9/15: Looks like the deals are now gone, and at the current time the below flights can be had for just around $1,000 round-trip.

The amazingly cheap airfares that Delta has maintained on flights to Tokyo, Japan over the last few days are now… ridiculously cheaper. However, as the saying goes, “certain restrictions apply.”

Delta now has cheap airfares from select US cities… most of which have already been mentioned on this blog… connecting to their late-night flights to Haneda Airport. Depending on the arrival and timing, there are more limited travel options out of Haneda in the late night hours compared to an afternoon arrival at Narita, so keep this in mind… unless of course you’re willing to spend night #1 at the hotel inside the terminal 🙂

Delta’s fares connecting to Haneda are now under $700 round trip. Found this morning:

Philadelphia to Tokyo Haneda: $674 round trip.
Charlotte to Tokyo Haneda: $668 round trip.
Miami to Tokyo Haneda: $670 round trip.
Dallas to Tokyo Haneda: $665 round trip.
Phoenix to Tokyo Haneda: $665 round trip.

Yes, these fares to Japan were found from American Airlines hubs.

Flying on Delta, with the exception of Phoenix, you will have to take TWO flights to connect to the Haneda flight out of Seattle. The start of the return trip goes to the US on a Haneda flight to either Seattle or Los Angeles. The fare is good for all Monday-Thursday flights throughout the year, except for some summer dates.

I am wondering if these fare sales are going on because of the US Department of Transportation’s recent ruling concerning the slot, or authority, awarded to Delta for flights between Seattle and Tokyo Haneda. Delta only operated this flight on occasion over the last few months, and while I won’t get into more specifics, the US DOT is requiring that Delta maintain a daily service on this route or else their slot will be forfeited and handed over to… surprise! – American Airlines. Maybe this is a way for them to desperately fill seats on that Seattle to Haneda flight?

In any case, you are the winner. If you’re willing to do a few hops to reach Tokyo, this is a ridiculously low airfare, so go ahead and book while it’s hot!

Airfare Alert! Delta flights to Japan on sale for April and May

This offer appears to have ended (Updated 3/2)

Today Delta Air Lines launched a sale on its flights to Tokyo Haneda – the ones that land and take off during the late night/early morning hours. The fares for flights connecting to these are also discounted.

The Economy airfare on Delta from Los Angeles is $600 round-trip… that’s right, ROUND TRIP, for flights departing and returning on all dates in April and May, except Fridays and Saturdays. Flights from Seattle to Haneda are $680 round-trip for almost the same time frame.

Lowest airfares from connecting cities:

*San Francisco, $615 r/t

*Las Vegas, $615 r/t

*Denver, $782 r/t

*Dallas DFW, $797 r/t

*San Antonio, $841 r/t

*Houston, $913 r/t

*Minneapolis, $931 r/t

*Chicago, $841 r/t

*Orlando, $745 r/t

*Baltimore, $841 r/t

*New York, $745 r/t

*Boston, $942 r/t

Note that you may have to connect once OR TWICE in either direction for the trip. Also, as I’ve mentioned on the blog before, it’s HANEDA. You’ll need to do some research to figure out the best options to/from the airport late in the evening, and you will also want to double check your departure time going back to the US… If it’s a 12:10 AM flight on a Monday, then be sure to show up on Sunday night!

Airline Sale Fares from Newark, Washington and Los Angeles to Tokyo for Fall 2014

9/3/14 – These fares have expired.

Sale Fares from US to Japan for Fall Travel

I’m writing this post today to make readers aware of great discounts for travel to Japan during Fall 2014. It’s possible that these airlines need to fill some seats, so if you would like to visit the land of the rising sun, even 2 weeks from when I write this, the time to act is now!

NEW YORK TO TOKYO (from Newark) and WASHINGTON TO TOKYO (from Dulles)

American Airlines has sale fares from both Newark Airport near New York, and Dulles Airport near Washington DC, to Tokyo Narita via connections in their US hubs for travel through early December starting as low as $943 round-trip. Travel must take place Monday through Thursday and you must return within 90 days or by December 24.

LOS ANGELES TO TOKYO

United Airlines has put their nonstop service from Los Angeles to Tokyo Narita – on a new Boeing 787 Dreamliner – on sale recently, and now it looks like Delta has joined the price war. For most departures through early December flights on either airline – both nonstop – can be had for as low as $929 round-trip.

Good luck on booking these, and enjoy your trip to Japan!

Japan Diary – September 11, 2013 Morning

Over the next few days I am hoping to re-post my diary from my September 2013 trip to Japan. Here’s the first post, written the morning after my arrival in Kyoto.

My travel companion is my girlfriend (now fiancé), Jordan, along with the unofficial ‘trip mascots’, a plush lobster and cat.  We are joined by our friend Daniel from Canada later in the trip.

Ok everyone! Here’s a summary of our Japan trip so far….

Check-in at LaGuardia went well and we got to Detroit with no issues.

When we got onto the plane in Detroit, it was discovered that in the business class cabin a few rows ahead of us, one of the overhead baggage bins was missing a federally-mandated weight limit sticker.

That’s right, we were delayed a little more than an hour just because there was a small sticker missing on the plane.

Soon after I saw an airport worker use packing tape to put the new label on the plane, we were on our way.

The flight was a little rough… we tried to sleep but it was difficult. Especially because there was a (insert bad word here) directly across from us on the opposite side of the plane that would open his window fully every 20 or 30 minutes. Didn’t seem like he needed to sleep at all, cause this happened from start to finish. NO consideration whatsoever!

We landed in Nagoya in the evening (only 20 minutes late), and were bowed to by the airport workers as we stepped off of the plane, which was a nice treat.

Immigration and customs went smoothly, we got our big bag sent through to the luggage delivery service, and only 70 minutes or so after we landed we were on our way to Nagoya station by way of the Meitetsu “Myu-sky”.

We connected to the shinkansen in Nagoya city (Nozomi 253)… we were at Kyoto station by 9 PM and in our hotel by 9:30.

The good thing is that we both slept well, though I had to check on the air conditioning every few hours or so. Turns out the AC was in “HEAT” mode instead of “COOL” mode!

Off to breakfast, then to our plans for the day which will hopefully include Kinkakuji (Golden temple) and a monkey park.

We did not take photos or videos last night as it was pretty dark anyway, and we were both worn out. But we’ll be on the task today.

Say a prayer for us as we start the first full day in Kyoto!

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS (Feb. 2014)

Nagoya Airport – technically Chubu Centrair International Airport – was a real pleasure to fly into. The arrival formalities were very straightforward for an airport that is now Japan’s third major gateway for International flights behind Tokyo and Osaka… the airport had only opened in 2005.

Seeing the bowing airport workers was a surprise to be sure… What I liked especially about the airport was that all of the arrival procedures were on a single level – a very short walk from the airport to Quarantine, then Immigration, then Baggage Claims, then Customs, then the exit.

Luggage delivery service is a tremendous benefit for passengers with large suitcases. You can have your luggage delivered to any destination in Japan for a reasonable cost. This allows you to carry light luggage onto whatever mode of public transport being used – many of which don’t have spaces for large suitcases. If I remember correctly, it only cost us about 2,000 yen to transport our large suitcase from Nagoya to our hotel in Kyoto.

Our starting city was Kyoto. There is an airport much closer to Kyoto – Kansai Airport. But for some reason it would cost both of us several hundred dollars extra to fly there. Working out the expenses, it turned out to be a cheaper journey if we flew into Nagoya Airport, took the airport train to the center of the city, and then took the Shinkansen for the quick trip into Kyoto.

Our itinerary for the trip was ‘open-jaw’. By starting in Nagoya and ending in Tokyo, instead of doing a round-trip in and out of Tokyo, we were able to maximize our sightseeing time, not to mention the difference in airfare was only a few dollars.

In the airport’s access plaza is the entrance to Meitetsu and their airport train, as well as a Family Mart, one of the top convenience store chains in Japan with over 10,000 outlets. That’s where Jordan fell in love with the Family Mart-brand soy sauce crackers. None could be found in Kyoto, but there’d be plenty of these to snack on once we got to Tokyo later in the trip.