QR Codes coming to the Japan Rail Pass

As I have mentioned in previous posts (here and here), Japan Railways (JR) is planning to make a cosmetic change to the appearance to the national Japan Rail Pass.

Given that the coronavirus pandemic is still an issue, JR is still planning to implement the Rail Pass changes on June 1, 2020 as of the time of this post.

The newly upgraded Japan Rail Pass will turn the pass into a magnetic ticket. You will be able to use the ticket to pass through automatic ticket gates at JR stations as opposed to using the manned gates. Furthermore, you will be able to use ticket reservation machines at JR stations to make a free seat reservation or pick up existing reservations.

It appears from images just recently posted on the Japan Rail Pass website that access to the machines will be a two-step process. All of the new Japan Rail Pass tickets will be printed with a QR code on them. To access, you will select the Japan Rail Pass option on the home screen and hold up your ticket’s QR code to the machine’s QR scanner. (If there is no QR scanner then you will type in the ticket number on your rail pass using the touch screen.) After that, you will enter your passport number to confirm that you are the owner of the ticket.

Entering your passport number into the machine might cause concern for a few, though I believe the option will still exist of going to a manned counter to make seat reservations if needed.

Regardless, you will have to go to a manned counter once in order to receive the actual rail pass. You will be asked to show your passport to the clerk to confirm your eligibility, and you will also be required to turn in your exchange voucher or show proof of payment.

As mentioned before, the Japan Rail Pass will be sold directly by JR on a dedicated website. The prices will be in Japanese Yen and will be slightly higher than the prices for exchange vouchers. However, one perk of purchasing your pass through JR directly is that you will have access to JR’s reservation system to make free seat reservations beforehand if you wish, within the validity of your pass.

The exchange voucher system will be in place until at least 2023. Exchange vouchers are sold by authorized travel agencies and retailers in your local country (in person and online) and in your local currency, plus any markups/shipping fees that may be added by the seller. It appears to have been clarified – contrary to earlier posts – that even if you use an exchange voucher, you will still receive a Japan Rail Pass ticket with a QR code, you can still use a ticket machine to make seat reservations and pick up reservations after receiving your pass, and you can still use the automatic ticket gates. However, you cannot make advance train reservations before your trip and must wait until you arrive in Japan to make the reservations.

It might make sense, then, to purchase directly through JR if there is a specific train or two you would like to reserve in advance, or if you are traveling when it might be busy and a seat reservation might be hard to obtain at the last minute. Otherwise, purchasing an exchange voucher the old way may save you some money.

Remember that in some instances you may not need a reserved seat ticket… if you are able to access non-reserved seating then you can simply walk into a non-reserved car and find any open seat. Your Japan Rail Pass will be enough for the journey.

Also, don’t forget that depending on your situation, you might not need to get a Japan Rail Pass. Please read my post on whether or not the Japan Rail Pass is right for you.

Learning more about the advantages the refreshed Japan Rail Pass offers gives me more inspiration to plan for my next Japan trip… whenever it happens.

Will you take advantage of the new Japan Rail Pass product? Let me know in the comments below.

Coronavirus Update – 22 April 2020

2019-nCoV-CDC-23312_without_backgroundI hope that you and your family and friends continue to stay healthy and safe as the world continues to face this global pandemic. There are some more updates to Japan’s travel restrictions, which I will try to summarize as best as I can.

Bear in mind, these probably don’t factor in to a lot of near-term travel plans anyway, given that a good number of passenger flights between Japan and the rest of the world are not operating right now. All Nippon Airways (ANA), for example, has just reduced their New York-Tokyo flights from two round-trips per day to one round-trip per week until the end of May… this probably is a result of plans by the Japanese government to extend Japan’s entry ban.

All of the latest updates can be found on the website of the Japan National Tourism Organization. They have a dedicated web page with regard to the travel restrictions.

  1. Foreign nationals who have been in one of over 70 countries or regions in the last 14 days are denied entry into Japan, except in extraordinary circumstances. Some of the affected locations include Australia, Canada, China, New Zealand, South Korea, the United States and most of Europe. The JNTO link has the complete list. Kyodo News recently reported that additional countries and regions will be added to the list this week, and that entry restrictions will be extended until the end of May.
  2. Visa arrangements from certain countries and regions (including visa exemptions, i.e. for tourism) are suspended. The JNTO link has the complete list. Previously, countries such as Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States were on the visa suspension list. Although this is no longer the case, these countries are still among the locations in the entry ban.
  3. All international passengers arriving in (and allowed to enter) Japan will be requested to quarantine and avoid using public transportation for 14 days.
  4. All passengers arriving from a location included in the entry ban are subject to on-the-spot coronavirus testing. You will be kept at a government-designated facility while awaiting the coronavirus test results. It’s also possible that due to capacity reasons, you could be flown to another city to undergo testing. (For example, a recent update from All Nippon Airways (ANA) indicates that those arriving into Narita Airport in Tokyo could be flown to Chubu Centrair Airport in Nagoya for coronavirus testing, then be flown back to Narita if the tests are all clear.) If you test negative, you’ll still be requested to quarantine and avoid using public transportation for 14 days.

It remains obvious… do not travel to Japan unless you have an essential reason to do so. While some countries seem to be getting a grip on the coronavirus situation, the number of cases in Japan is starting to increase. Let’s all continue to do our part so that one day, we can all travel again to the places that we love.

The coronavirus illustration is public domain pursuant to Title 17, Section 105 of the United States Code.

Coronavirus Update – 1 April 2020

2019-nCoV-CDC-23312_without_background

New information about coronavirus-related travel restrictions has been posted since this was written. Please reload the home page of the blog for the latest update.

Japan has enacted additional border-strengthening measures in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. As this is a major development, I will summarize it in a new post as best as I can.

Going forward, I will be flagging any old posts related to coronavirus-related travel updates in an effort to avoid any confusion.

All of the latest updates can be found on the website of the Japan National Tourism Organization. They have a dedicated web page with regard to the travel restrictions.

The new measures go into effect as of midnight Japan time on Friday, April 3, 2020.

  1. Foreign nationals who have been in one of over 70 countries or regions in the last 14 days will be denied entry into Japan, except in extraordinary circumstances. Some of the affected locations include Australia, Canada, China, New Zealand, South Korea, the United States and most of Europe. The JNTO link has the complete list.
  2. Visa arrangements from certain countries and regions (including visa exemptions, i.e. for tourism) will be suspended. Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States are some of the affected countries that will be subject to the visa cancellation. The JNTO link has the complete list.
  3. All arrivals from locations included in the entry ban, including Japanese nationals and foreigners allowed to enter Japan because of extraordinary circumstances, are subject to on-the-spot coronavirus testing and will be asked to quarantine for 14 days.
  4. All arrivals from locations not included in the entry ban will be asked to quarantine for 14 days.

Essentially, everyone that is not banned from entering Japan will be asked to quarantine. Those requested to quarantine will also be asked to refrain from using public transportation during the quarantine period.

Today is my birthday… yes, I’m an April Fools baby. But, the current crisis in our world is no joke. Let’s all do our best to stay safe, and let’s give thanks to all of the first responders and essential members of the workforce that are putting everything on the line during these difficult times.

My advice: Do not travel to Japan unless you have an essential reason to do so. Japan will still be around for you to discover and enjoy once the worst of this pandemic has passed.

The coronavirus illustration is public domain pursuant to Title 17, Section 105 of the United States Code.

Coronavirus Update – 18 March 2020

New information about coronavirus-related travel restrictions has been posted since this was written. Please reload the home page of the blog for the latest update.

Since I wrote the last Coronavirus Update at the end of February, I – and I’m sure most of you – had no idea the severity of the pandemic would reach where it is today. I want to take a moment to update you on the current issues regarding travel to Japan.

Should you travel to Japan right now? The number of new cases have slowed in Japan in recent days, and there are few travel advisories to Japan because the country has taken very aggressive steps to contain the outbreak. Nevertheless, other countries and regions may have their own views – not only on Japan, but on global travel in general. Some, like the United States, are suggesting that all travelers reconsider leaving their home country. Others, like Australia, simply say to do not travel.

My opinion at this point is to reconsider any non-essential travel. In other words, if traveling as a tourist, wait until the worst of this has passed before visiting Japan.

The information below is accurate, to the best of my knowledge, at the time of publication (Afternoon of March 18, 2020, Eastern Time) and is subject to the site-wide disclaimer.

Japan has instituted (or will be implementing) strict border controls barring travel into Japan from certain parts of the world aside from exceptional circumstances.

The Japan National Tourist Organization’s page on the coronavirus has an up-to-date list on the regions in the world from which entry is restricted. As of the time of writing, this includes portions of China, Iran, Italy, South Korea, Spain and Switzerland, and for all of Iceland and San Marino. Also, anyone holding a Chinese passport from Hubei and Zhejiang are included in the restrictions.

In addition, those arriving from certain parts of the world are being asked to voluntarily self-quarantine for 14 days and avoid using public transportation. As of the time of this writing, this includes all arrivals from China, Macau, Hong Kong and South Korea. As of March 21, 2020, the self-quarantine requests will expand to include most of Europe. This includes all arrivals from the Schengen Area countries and regions, plus Ireland and the United Kingdom. All arrivals from Egypt and Iran will also be asked to self-quarantine. Visas issued by Japan for arrivals from these areas have been cancelled as of the effective date of the quarantine, including some with visa exemptions.

Effective March 26, 2020, all arrivals from the United States are requested to self-quarantine. However, per the JNTO, visa arrangements from the United States are not affected.

You may also wish to consider that there are some countries and regions that have issued entry restrictions for those who have visited Japan in the last 14 days, or for any international travel. For example, Taiwan and Malaysia have decided to ban the entry of all foreign nationals in recent days.

The Japanese government continues to request that public gatherings and events be cancelled, postponed or scaled back. This means that many tourists sites in Japan are subject to closure or reduced hours. Group tours and events such as public conventions, religious services and concerts may be subject to cancellation or alteration.

Here are some preventative actions you can take for your health, as suggested by the CDC:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • If you are sick, stay home.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Use a regular household cleaning spray or wipe to disinfect frequently touched objects, such as door handles.
  • Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at 60%–95% alcohol. Use soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.
  • Wash your hands after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.

The most common symptoms of coronavirus are fever, and signs of a lower respiratory illness such as coughing or shortness of breath. However, some cases of coronavirus are reported to have been diagnosed without any symptoms shown at all.

If you show symptoms of coronavirus, inform your health professional right away. Consider visiting your doctor or an urgent care facility, or a tele-health visit. Only go to a hospital if directed to do so.

Allow increased travel time when traveling internationally, in order to allow for more stringent health checks. If you land in Japan and do not feel well, report yourself to Quarantine or Health Consultation immediately (this is the first step of arrival procedures into the country, before immigration checks).

Whatever you do, please stay informed, travel safely, and do not take unnecessary risks that may compromise your health.

In addition to the JNTO, i recommend viewing the news updates from public broadcaster NHK. Here’s a link to their page dedicated to coronavirus news. I’ll provide another update as conditions warrant.

Coronavirus Update for Japan

2019-nCoV-CDC-23312_without_background

New information about coronavirus-related travel restrictions has been posted since this was written. Please reload the home page of the blog for the latest update.

I am deeply concerned (as I’m sure some of my followers are) about the coronavirus outbreak that has been spreading across many parts of the world now. I thought it would be useful to share a few updates with you when it comes to the current situation of travel in Japan.

I don’t plan to post any updates too often on this, so I would highly suggest online news sources for the latest information. One I highly recommend is NHK World-Japan, whose English web site has a dedicated page with all of the latest news updates on the coronavirus as it affects Japan and other parts of the world.

The information is accurate, to the best of my knowledge, at the time of publication (Morning of February 27, 2020, Eastern Time) and is subject to the site-wide disclaimer.

  • There are no urgent travel advisories or warnings from major countries when it comes to visiting Japan. However, some countries and regions in Asia and the Pacific are banning entries from foreigners who have visited Japan in the last two weeks.
  • Many of the world’s major countries and territories have advised an increased level of caution when traveling around Japan due to the outbreak. Some organizations, like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC (the national public health body of the United States), have recommended that the elderly, and those with pre-existing/chronic medical conditions, defer nonessential travel to Japan.
  • This week, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe requested that all elementary schools and high schools in Japan close for the month of March, and that public gatherings and events be cancelled, postponed or scaled back over the next few weeks in order to contain the coronavirus outbreak. This means that many tourists sites in Japan are subject to closure or reduced hours. Group tours and events such as public conventions, religious services and concerts may be subject to cancellation or alteration.
  • Some major sports have already begun to either postpone their events, or close events to the general public. The Sumo Association is supposed to decide by March 1 whether or not to go ahead with the March Grand Sumo Tournament in Osaka.

Here are some preventative actions you can take for your health, as suggested by the CDC:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • If you are sick, stay home.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Use a regular household cleaning spray or wipe to disinfect frequently touched objects, such as door handles.
  • Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at 60%–95% alcohol. Use soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.
  • Wash your hands after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.

The most common symptoms of coronavirus are fever, and signs of a lower respiratory illness such as coughing or shortness of breath. However, some cases of coronavirus are reported to have been diagnosed without any symptoms shown at all.

If you have been in Japan (or another area affected by the outbreak) in the last 14 days and show symptoms of coronavirus, inform your health professional right away. Consider visiting your doctor or an urgent care facility, and only go to a hospital if directed to do so.

Allow increased travel time when traveling internationally to and from Japan, in order to allow for more stringent health checks. If you land in Japan and do not feel well, report yourself to Quarantine or Health Consultation immediately (this is the first step of arrival procedures into the country, before immigration checks).

I’ll update this post only if there are updates in the very near term, otherwise please consult NHK World or your local media service for the latest updates.

The coronavirus illustration was published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. It is therefore public domain pursuant to Title 17, Section 105 of the United States Code.

So You’ve Landed In Japan – Arrival Procedures

Back in… 2014 (?!) I did a blog series called “So You’ve Landed in Japan.” One of the posts ended up turning into my most popular post on this entire blog. The post is with regards to Customs and Immigration and discussed the procedures a traveler faces when entering Japan from another international destination.

Looking back on that post, I feel as if the title of the post was a little misleading. Most of the comments on the post were specific questions about immigration status, visa inquiries, and that sort of thing. This blog is meant to offer advice on travel to Japan, but in no way am I qualified to handle specific immigration questions.

Based on this, and because arrival procedures and forms have changed in recent years, I’ve decided to renew this post and title it, more appropriately, Arrival Procedures.

At the outset, I wish to reiterate that if you have any specific questions about Japanese immigration or visas, please contact your local Japanese embassy or consulate. I will discuss this information in a very broad scope (as I did in the previous post) but, again, I am not equipped to answer specific questions on this. A great resource is on the web site of Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The link to all of their consulates and embassies can be found here. Please contact them for all of your specific inquiries. I’ve updated the site-wide disclaimer with this information as well.

Prerequisites

Of course, before visiting Japan, you will need a Passport and, in certain circumstances, you will also need a visa. People visiting Japan from 68 countries and regions do not require a visa if visiting as a tourist, or if visiting relatives, attending conferences, etc. All but four of these are eligible for visa exemptions of 90 days. If you are engaging in paid work in Japan, or if you will be staying in the country longer than the amount of time granted for a visa exemption, you will have to apply for a visa.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs maintains a list of countries and regions eligible for visa exemptions.

Forms to fill out

Many international travelers are used to filling out immigration and/or customs forms to be submitted upon arrival to wherever they are going. Many countries are starting to phase out physical paperwork in favor of automatic kiosks. Japan, with some exceptions, still uses paperwork.

Visitors to Japan typically fill out two or three different forms prior to their arrival.

  • All visitors fill out a disembarkation form for immigration (one per person) and a customs form (one per family).
  • If you are bringing pets or plant/animal products into Japan, you will have to fill out a quarantine form. Visitors from certain parts of the world with health concerns may also have to fill out a quarantine form or questionnaire.

Unlike countries where one entity handles all entry procedures (such as Customs and Border Protection in the United States), Japan has separate ones:

  • Pet, Animal and Plant Quarantine is under the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
  • Health Quarantine is under the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare
  • Immigration had been its own ministry until 2019, and is now under the Ministry of Justice
  • Customs is under the Ministry of Finance (which includes the Customs and Tariff Bureau).

Disembarkation Form (Immigration)

japanimmigrationform (2)Shown here is a photo of the new disembarkation card that Japan has been using since 2016. Each passenger should fill out their own disembarkation card.

Let’s go through each of the steps to fill out.

Fill out your family name and given names as they are listed on your passport, your date of birth (in the form of day, month and year) and the country and city where you currently reside. You do not need to enter a passport number, gender or nationality, which was the case with previous versions of the form.

Check the box next to the purpose of your visit. Most visitors will select the box for tourists.

Next to this, you’ll see Last Flight No./Vessel. Write down the flight number (or vessel if you arrive by boat) that you used to enter Japan. For example, if you were flying into Japan on United Airlines Flight 79 from Newark, New Jersey, you’d write down either United 79 or UA 79 in this box.

Below this, write down the number of days you plan to stay in Japan.

The next field asks for your intended address in Japan. The rule of thumb I’ve always used is to enter the first location that you plan to stay in when visiting the country. If you will go from the airport to a friend’s residence, enter their residence here and their telephone number. Otherwise, if you are going to a hotel, enter the hotel name, address and telephone number as best as you can. Even if you are staying in multiple locations, just write down the first one you will be using.

The last few questions must be asked to comply with the laws of Japan, so you have to answer them:

  • Have you ever been deported or refused entry into Japan?
  • Have you ever been convicted of a crime in Japan or another country?
  • Are you in possession of controlled substances, guns, bladed weapons or gunpowder?

Sign your disembarkation form, and that’s it!

Customs Form

japancustomsformHere is a photo of form C5360-B, otherwise known as the Declaration of Personal Effects and Unaccompanied Articles, or the Customs Declaration. Note that this is a double-sided form; both sides are shown here.

Here you will fill out some of the same details you entered on the immigration form, plus a few other particulars.

In addition to your flight or vessel number, you will need to write down the point of embarkation, or in other words, the location you departed from to enter Japan. For our example of United Flight 79, you’d write down Newark.

Here you must also enter your nationality, occupation, passport, and number of family members traveling with you. Remember that one customs declaration can be submitted per family.

Next, answer the questions about articles you are bringing into Japan. Follow the instructions to declare this information on the back of the form if necessary.

The back of the form will include the duty-free allowance per person for items being brought into Japan, along with a list of prohibited and restricted articles.

Once you have completed the form, all that’s left to do is to sign it.

Quarantine Form

If you are entering Japan with pets, or with plant/animal products, you will have to fill out specific quarantine forms. Please visit the website of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries for more information on this type of quarantine.

Depending on health circumstances, some visitors may also be asked to fill out a health quarantine form or questionnaire. This varies depending on the situation. For example, as of this post (25 February 2020) there are concerns about the coronavirus outbreak, and some information published by the Japanese Embassy in New York suggests that quarantine forms are being circulated asking passengers if they have visited, or plan to visit, certain regions of China within 14 days of their arrival into Japan.

Entry Procedures

Now that all of the paperwork is done, let’s look into the steps of arriving into Japan.

When you step off of a plane or boat, your entry procedures will follow these basic steps:

  • Health Quarantine
  • Immigration
  • Baggage Claim
  • Pet / Animal / Plant Quarantine
  • Customs

The first step is health quarantine. Most passengers entering Japan will walk by an infrared scanner which checks your body temperature. If a quarantine officer notices anything amiss, you will be asked to enter the health consultation room and speak to a doctor. You can also voluntarily check in to this room if you feel sick or unwell for any reason. If you were handed a health quarantine form/questionnaire, you will probably be asked to submit it here.

Immigration is the next step. Step up when you are called, one person at a time, to the immigration officer. Submit your passport, your disembarkation form, and your visa if required. The immigration officer will check your documents, take your photo and collect your fingerprints. You might also be asked a few questions to determine your entry status. The officer will then stamp your passport and you can then proceed to baggage claim to collect your checked belongings. Note that in a few locations, you might be checked by a clerk before you arrive at the immigration desk to take your photograph and fingerprints… this happened to me at Narita during my last trip in 2017.

If you have pets, or plant/animal products, this is the point where you will check in to the respective quarantine desk to handle those procedures.

The last step is to go to customs. As with most countries, there will be a green channel if you have nothing to declare or within duty-free exemptions, and a red channel if you have items to declare or if you are not sure. Whatever the case, you will speak to another manned officer at customs. Here the officer will check your passport and review your customs declaration. Remember, customs has the right to search your belongings to ensure there are no prohibited or restricted articles. The officer may ask you some questions, such as where you are from, and if you have any items to declare. One time, I was asked about my precise itinerary when I was in the country. There is a cashier nearby if you need to pay any duty.

If you are in doubt about anything that you are bringing into Japan, visit the red channel.

acs-drugs-medications-infographic-1

On a side note, do remember that Japan has strict laws with regard to certain drugs and medications, as the above graphic from the U.S. Department of State indicates. For example, stimulants cannot be brought into Japan under any circumstances. Visitors to Japan may not be aware that certain over-the-counter or behind-the-counter medications use to treat pain, decongestion, cold/flu, ADHD and depression cannot be brought in to Japan. So leave your Sudafed, Actifed, NyQuil and Vicks inhalers at home, and don’t bring medicine containing things such as codeine, pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, dexamphetamine or anything with HCl (hydrochloride) in the name. Also, even though marijuana and CBD/THC oils are gaining popularity in a lot of places, these are also illegal in Japan. You could be detained by Customs (or worse) if you are caught with these drugs and medications.

Certain prescription medications may also have to be declared in advance… please consult your local Japanese embassy or consulate for more information. Alternatively, you can e-mail your inquiries directly to the Japanese government at this e-mail: yakkan@mhlw.go.jp.

You’ve arrived!

Congratulations, and welcome to Japan!

There are just a few more things you may want to be aware about when it comes to arrival procedures:

International Transit

If you are landing in an airport in Japan for the purpose of changing to another international flight, and you do not plan to leave the airport, you do not need to go through immigration and customs procedures in Japan. All that is required is another security check. Remember the restrictions on liquids… if you have any duty-free liquids on your person that are not in tamper evident bags, they will be confiscated at the transit security checkpoint.

If you are a connecting to a domestic flight, or if you are changing from one airport to another (i.e changing from a flight landing at Narita to a flight departing from Haneda), you’ll need to undergo customs and immigration.

Automated Immigration Kiosk

Japan’s major ports of entry (i.e. the major airports) have automated kiosks for entry into Japan. However, while major countries have some kind of automatic kiosks in place, Japan’s kiosks are not available for all foreigners. You must enroll in a special trusted traveler program and meet specific requirements, one of which states that you must have visited Japan at least twice in the last twelve months. Aside from this, only Japanese nationals and foreigners residing in Japan currently qualify to use the automated kiosks.

Videos on Arrival Procedures

Japan Airlines has some links on their website to videos about arrival procedures for JAL flights into Japan’s four major international airports of Haneda, Narita, Chubu Centrair and Kansai. Visit JAL’s excellent Guide to Japan, and from that page, click on “More Fun”, select “Travel Information” and scroll down to the Immigration Guidance section. Just don’t mind the (rather catchy) elevator music.

UPDATE April 3, 2020: Japan Airlines has recently updated their website, so the above link to the immigration guidance videos MIGHT be going away soon.

I hope this post answers your questions about arrival procedures in Japan.

Once again, if you have any detailed questions about immigration, customs, visas, etc., please contact your local Japanese embassy or consulate. Such questions will NOT be answered on this blog.

This article was written in February 2020 and is accurate at the time of publication, subject to the site-wide disclaimer.

Images of Japanese immigration and customs documentation are public domain pursuant to Article 13(ii) of the Copyright Law of Japan.

The graphic about prohibited drugs in Japan is from the United States Department of State and is public domain pursuant to Title 17, Section 105 of the United States Code.

Coronavirus Outbreak

As you may have seen in the news, Japan is affected by the recent coronavirus outbreak in the region. As of this writing (25 February 2020) some NPHIs, including the Centers for Disease Control in the United States, have recommended that the elderly and those with chronic/pre-existing health conditions defer travel to Japan. Many governments have issued travel notices advising their citizens to exercise increased caution in Japan due to health concerns.

The coronavirus outbreak is still developing. The US CDC has advised against all nonessential travel to neighboring South Korea as of this post, so it remains to be seen whether or not a similar advisory will be issued for Japan in the future.

If you plan to visit Japan, here are some common sense recommendations from the US CDC:
*Avoid contact with sick people.
*Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
*Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at 60%–95% alcohol. Use soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.
*Wash your hands after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
*If you have been in Japan (or another country affected by the outbreak) in the last 14 days and feel sick with fever, coughing, or difficulty breathing, contact a medical professional.

As someone with a pre-existing health condition, I hope that things in Japan will be sorted out, as I would like to try for visit #5 to the land of the rising sun very soon.

This article was written in February 2020 and is accurate at the time of publication, subject to the site-wide disclaimer.