Japan Trip 2017 Video #2

Presenting my next Japan travel video! This covers the activity on October 11.

I’ve landed at Narita, and am making my way towards Tokyo as the weather gets worse. I’ve planned to visit Tokyo SkyTree tonight, and I read that the clouds will eventually break up later in the evening. Will the reports hold true? Watch the video to find out! I’ll also stroll a bit around the SkyTree, finding one of my favorite drinks in a vending machine along the way.

Advertisements

Japan Trip 2017 Video #1

Thanks for waiting… here is the first Japan travel video! In this video I focus on my travel experience flying to Tokyo Narita airport.

As this video focuses ONLY on flying, those who want to see what happens after I actually set foot in Japan should wait for the next video…

OTHERWISE, please enjoy this first video, which runs over 20 minutes. You’ll see how I traveled in a premium class of service, thanks to redeeming my American Airlines frequent flyer miles. This cost 60,000 miles to travel in international business class. My connecting flight, from Dallas to Tokyo, was in Japan Airlines’ 787 Dreamliner.

 

Japan Trip Teaser Video Posted!

Hello! It’s already been almost two weeks since I returned from Japan, and I miss it already!

I’m sorry to have been silent here on the blog as I’ve focused my posts on my Facebook page, and a little bit on Instagram too. Now that I am starting to review all of my photos and videos I hope to share all of the experiences of my trip with you here!

The first video is available, and that’s the teaser video! I used software called Quik from GoPro, which is free to download, to automatically assemble photos and videos set to music. This gives you a first glimpse at what I saw in Japan. Enjoy!

Time to go back to Japan!

This week I will go to Japan for the fourth time.

It’s wonderful to be able to go across the Pacific horizons again and visit a culture that I’ve appreciated for almost all my life.

I am still lacking in my Japanese after all these years, but I’ll manage.

The preparation is over. The luggage is packed… almost.

I’ll try to share some updates here, but during the trip I’ll most likely be sharing updates on my Facebook page (facebook.com/myjapantips), on Twitter/Periscope (@myjapantips) and on Instagram (jrsideproject).

I look forward to sharing my progress with everyone.

間もなく, 日本… Here I come!

Are you sure you need a Japan Rail Pass?

I have a new video update that was posted today to my Facebook page, located at facebook.com/myjapantips.

Amidst the unusually cool weather for a late August day in Upstate New York, I tackled the issue of the national Japan Rail Pass. Many online sites have articles that claim that the Japan Rail Pass is the best deal for train travel in Japan, and you have to get your hands on one.

The first part of that statement is true. The second? Not necessarily.

The Japan Rail Pass provides unlimited travel on Japan Railways lines, including all shinkansen trains (except Nozomi and Mizuho) for 7, 14 or 21 consecutive days in either ordinary class or green class (first class). You can also make free seat reservations on all services that offer them, which include bullet trains and many limited express services, such as the Narita Express and Haruka trains to/from Narita Airport and Kansai Airport, respectively.

To obtain a Japan Rail Pass, you purchase a voucher in your home country from a travel agency, and exchange the voucher for the actual pass when you arrive in Japan. This year JR has started trial sales for the pass in Japan with no voucher exchange necessary, but at higher prices.

The most important question – or perhaps the only question – that you have to ask yourself is: Will getting a pass be cheaper than buying regular tickets?

To answer this question, put together a list of cities that you would like to visit in Japan. Then, figure out the fares between the two cities. Several online sites will tell you the amount. Two sites I recommend are HyperDia and the JR East site (the latter only lets you search bullet train fares by individual line).

One example: If you’re in Japan for a week, and will only travel between Tokyo and Kyoto, a 7-Day Rail Pass (29,110 yen for ordinary class) might not work out, as the regular round-trip fare between these two cities is cheaper (27,820 yen). If, on the other hand, you add another side trip, then the rail pass might pay off.

If your trip includes visits to, say, Tokyo, Kyoto, Hiroshima, Fukuoka or Hokkaido – which just gained access to the bullet train network recently – then you most certainly can look into a national rail pass. There are also a plethora of regional and local passes that are available… if you’re just meandering around Tokyo for example, consider one of several day passes, including the Tokunai Pass for unlimited JR travel in one day for 750 yen, or the 24-hour Tokyo Metro open ticket for 600 yen. You could also use a stored fare card such as a Suica or PASMO card.

Be sure to do your homework to see if a Rail Pass is something you really need!