Posted by: jrhorse | June 30, 2018

Tax-Free Shopping in Japan Just Got Better

Greetings everyone! It’s been a while since I last posted here… so before I go into the topic at hand, I just wanted to quickly say thanks to everyone for their continued support. I have been sharing my Japan travel videos on my Facebook page primarily, and I am finally down to the last one! Yes, it’s only been… just about nine months since I went? The last video will be a very long one, documenting my trip on Japan Airlines in International First Class. I expect that video to be released sometime in July.

Now that I’ve almost finished my travel video series, I can go back to the task at hand: giving you tips and suggestions on how to make the most of your next trip to Japan, based on my experience of four visits as a tourist, and based on my research.

Here’s some exciting news in case you want to visit Japan and do some tax-free shopping! You can now get a refund of the 8% consumption tax (like a sales tax) if purchasing a combination of general and consumable items totaling at least 5,000 yen at a tax-free shop.

Within the last few years Japan added a number of eligible products that can be purchased tax-free in the country by foreign tourists. Products were classified in two categories: General products like clothes, jewelry, shoes and appliances, and Consumable products like food, cosmetics, alcohol and tobacco. The previous rule was that if you spent at least 5,000 yen in one of these categories, you would receive the tax rebate. Until now, you could not combine the total for both general products and consumable products…. for example, if you spent 3,000 yen in each category, you would not be eligible for the tax rebate. Under the new rules, you CAN get the rebate.

When you combine general and consumable items in a single transaction, then you cannot use the items while in Japan and must take them out of the country within 30 days.

Hopefully this makes it easier to purchase great items in Japan without the tax. As a general rule, when you make these purchases you will be required to show your passport, and a receipt will be stapled into your passport for each shop. You will then be required to turn all of the receipts in to Japanese customs when you leave the country. At an airport, the customs desks are usually located between security and outbound immigration.

For more information, please see this handy guide from the JNTO.

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