Airfare Alert: Los Angeles to Tokyo on Singapore Airlines for $550 round-trip

It’s not too often that I pass along some nice airfare deals that I find while roaming the wonderful Internet, but this offer appears too good to pass up on.

As reported by the travel blog God Save the Points, Singapore Airlines has launched a sale on economy and premium economy seats on their daily flights from Los Angeles to Tokyo Narita airport. Economy tickets are are as low as $550 round-trip, while Premium Economy tickets are a good price as well – the blog reports fares starting at $1100 round-trip, though my recent Google Flights search comes up with flights in the range of $1300.

These are for round-trip flights in the beginning of 2019: January 10 through the end of May to be exact. Your return flight to Los Angeles must be no more than 30 days after your flight to Tokyo. Fares are available through July 9, or, as the sales lingo goes, “while supplies last.” So you might not want to wait too long to book a flight.

LA to Tokyo flights are usually priced competitively, but what makes this sale unique is that you are flying on one of the “fifth-freedom” routes of Singapore Airlines, widely heralded as one of the best airlines in the world. Indeed, it is one of ten airlines in the world to receive a 5-Star Airline ranking from SKYTRAX. (One of the others is Japan-based ANA). In fact, Singapore’s economy class cabin itself also received a 5-Star rating.

I’ve yet to see if other airlines have tried to match Singapore’s fare sale, but if you do a search on Google Flights the sale prices should be bookable on Singapore’s website and most of the major online travel sites.

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Japan Trip 2017 Video #4

Hello again! I’ve posted a few new videos from my Japan trip on YouTube already, but WordPress has been having some issues linking the videos on this blog. It’s been fixed it appears, so I’ll go ahead and start catching up here. If you don’t want to wait, please visit my YouTube playlist directly.

After spending the morning at the start of the old Tokaido, I head out by train to Shinagawa, Kawasaki and Ofuna. Attractions visited include the Tokaido Kawasaki-shuku Koryukan, a museum dedicated to teaching the history of the Old Tokaido in Kawasaki, and Ofuna Kannon-ji, a Buddhist temple whose feature is a 25-meter statue depicting the Bodhisattva Kannon.

Japan Trip 2017 Video #2

Presenting my next Japan travel video! This covers the activity on October 11.

I’ve landed at Narita, and am making my way towards Tokyo as the weather gets worse. I’ve planned to visit Tokyo SkyTree tonight, and I read that the clouds will eventually break up later in the evening. Will the reports hold true? Watch the video to find out! I’ll also stroll a bit around the SkyTree, finding one of my favorite drinks in a vending machine along the way.

Japan Trip 2017 Video #1

Thanks for waiting… here is the first Japan travel video! In this video I focus on my travel experience flying to Tokyo Narita airport.

As this video focuses ONLY on flying, those who want to see what happens after I actually set foot in Japan should wait for the next video…

OTHERWISE, please enjoy this first video, which runs over 20 minutes. You’ll see how I traveled in a premium class of service, thanks to redeeming my American Airlines frequent flyer miles. This cost 60,000 miles to travel in international business class. My connecting flight, from Dallas to Tokyo, was in Japan Airlines’ 787 Dreamliner.

 

Are you sure you need a Japan Rail Pass?

I have a new video update that was posted today to my Facebook page, located at facebook.com/myjapantips.

Amidst the unusually cool weather for a late August day in Upstate New York, I tackled the issue of the national Japan Rail Pass. Many online sites have articles that claim that the Japan Rail Pass is the best deal for train travel in Japan, and you have to get your hands on one.

The first part of that statement is true. The second? Not necessarily.

The Japan Rail Pass provides unlimited travel on Japan Railways lines, including all shinkansen trains (except Nozomi and Mizuho) for 7, 14 or 21 consecutive days in either ordinary class or green class (first class). You can also make free seat reservations on all services that offer them, which include bullet trains and many limited express services, such as the Narita Express and Haruka trains to/from Narita Airport and Kansai Airport, respectively.

To obtain a Japan Rail Pass, you purchase a voucher in your home country from a travel agency, and exchange the voucher for the actual pass when you arrive in Japan. This year JR has started trial sales for the pass in Japan with no voucher exchange necessary, but at higher prices.

The most important question – or perhaps the only question – that you have to ask yourself is: Will getting a pass be cheaper than buying regular tickets?

To answer this question, put together a list of cities that you would like to visit in Japan. Then, figure out the fares between the two cities. Several online sites will tell you the amount. Two sites I recommend are HyperDia and the JR East site (the latter only lets you search bullet train fares by individual line).

One example: If you’re in Japan for a week, and will only travel between Tokyo and Kyoto, a 7-Day Rail Pass (29,110 yen for ordinary class) might not work out, as the regular round-trip fare between these two cities is cheaper (27,820 yen). If, on the other hand, you add another side trip, then the rail pass might pay off.

If your trip includes visits to, say, Tokyo, Kyoto, Hiroshima, Fukuoka or Hokkaido – which just gained access to the bullet train network recently – then you most certainly can look into a national rail pass. There are also a plethora of regional and local passes that are available… if you’re just meandering around Tokyo for example, consider one of several day passes, including the Tokunai Pass for unlimited JR travel in one day for 750 yen, or the 24-hour Tokyo Metro open ticket for 600 yen. You could also use a stored fare card such as a Suica or PASMO card.

Be sure to do your homework to see if a Rail Pass is something you really need!

Throwback to June 2004 – Japan Trip 1, Day 1

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Wednesday, June 2, 2004 was my first full day as a tourist in Japan. The day was spent in Tokyo, with stops at the Imperial Palace, Asakusa and Odaiba. Here I posed with some school kids that were interviewing foreign tourists in English outside of Sensoji Temple, the oldest buddhist temple in the city. They gave out small gifts, which included the mailing address of their school. I regret that I never sent them a thank you gift in return. Nevertheless, meeting these young children speaking my language on my first day in another country – a day filled with anticipation and apprehension – made me feel very welcome, and helped deepen my appreciation for Japan even more.

I enjoy reminiscing about the first trip… and I can’t wait for the fourth trip, now less than two months away!